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Details Matter!

Posted by on Sep 22, 2013 in Blog | Comments Off on Details Matter!

With literally thousands of options in today’s remodeling market, choosing the right materials for your home can be rather confusing. Worse yet, picking products that suit your needs and finding the right designs and styles that fit your home are even harder. The key to remodeling your home is investing wisely and not overlooking the little details that build tremendous value in the long run. In a kitchen remodel, the bulk of the expense is cabinetry, countertops, and appliances. Since these items provide the three most important functions of a kitchen (storage, preparation and dining surfaces, and cooking and refrigeration), you should purchase the highest quality material you can afford. On that note, your budget should cover more than just those three items; budgeting in other extra details during your planning may well take your remodel from good to great. Paint matters. Repainting a room yourself is one of the most cost-effective ways to change the appearance of a room. A few gallons of paint will run you about $100, but the results can be dramatic. Large areas of colors are always one of the first things people notice, and color greatly affects the ambiance of a room. For instance, painting a room tan or green will make the room warmer. Alternatively, painting the room grey creates a cooler, more contemporary effect. And the greatest thing about paint is, unlike buying new appliances or changing a room’s layout, you can repaint again and again until you find the right shade without incurring huge costs. Lighting matters . Lighting is a key element in a successful remodel; yet many people miss it in their planning. The three main types of lighting include ambient, task, and accent lighting. Ambient lighting, or general illumination, includes sunlight, under-cabinet lights, ceiling lights, and pendants. Ambient light provides an overall lighting to the room. Task lighting is meant for specific task areas, such as over the sink or stove. And accent lighting is focused and can draw attention to display items or illuminate glass cabinets at a wet bar. Strategically utilizing all three types of lighting can significantly improve the appearance of your new kitchen. Molding and trim matter. Depending on the style of the room, molding and trim are often what “finishes off” the cabinetry, as well as the room itself. Instead of a plain toe kick for the cabinetry, try adding a baseboard. And in appropriate areas, use a furniture base for added effects. You can also add extra molding or onlay to areas such as a wooden hood or a stand-alone glass display cabinet. Trim around the room adds elegance and color. Paint, lighting, and molding & trim are only a few of the often forgotten aspects of a remodel. Other elements such as handles, window treatments, plumbing fixtures, and other personal decorative accents will all contribute to the remodel itself. Be sure to plan accordingly, budgeting these items into your remodel. The above content was published in Home Digest Magazine in November 2006. For reference to the actual copy, please download this pdf file. For other related content on how to get started on your remodel, please see How to Measure and Sketch a Floor Plan video, Typical Work Flow Procedure, and Typical Construction...

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Framed vs Frameless Cabinetry

Posted by on Sep 22, 2013 in Blog | Comments Off on Framed vs Frameless Cabinetry

While all cabinets serve the same purpose of storage, different cabinet constructions provide an overall different look and feel. With the increasingly heightened awareness in fashion designs in the furniture market, many homeowners are looking for more refined, quality products to fit their detailed specifications, and make a fashion statement with their furniture-like kitchens and bathrooms. Since each cabinet construction has its own advantage(s), understanding the different constructions can often help in deciding the more appropriate cabinet for your home. The more commonly known types of construction would be: framed, frameless, and inset. Due to space limitations, this article will be exploring the difference between framed vs. frameless cabinetry. Framed Cabinetry : Framed cabinetry refers to cabinetry built with a face frame. The cabinet’s carcass (the side panels of the cabinet) is attached to a solid wood frame in the front, and then the frame attaches to the door. Traditionally speaking, the American market has always preferred framed cabinetry because of its more rigid construction. Furthermore, in the event that less than ideal situations were to arise during an installation, framed cabinetry would allow more room for correction. It also tends to be more installation-friendly for amateurs and homeowners who are do-it-yourselfers. Additionally, framed cabinetry offers a more traditional, old world, elegant look that many home owners appreciate. Particularly, the solid wood face frame receives the same high-quality finish on the door, as opposed to the edge tape on top of the front of the side panels for frameless cabinetry. Frameless Cabinetry : As the name implies, frameless cabinetry differs from framed in that the cabinet has no face frame. It allows for full access to the interior storage space, making cleaning a much easier task to do. Frameless cabinetry, however, also comes with a certain association. In the traditional sense, the frameless cabinetry tends to be more affordable since less material is used. Today, however, frameless is usually associated with pricier European cabinetry, which typically ranges from $50,000 to $100,000 per kitchen, with three to six months lead time. The reason for the higher cost is largely due to the technologies involved in the more difficult manufacturing process for doors, as well as the almost endless amount of accessories and hardware. The amount of precision involved is very different from framed cabinetry, where doors tend to have larger gaps (smaller overlays) in between them. Frameless cabinetry has doors that almost fully cover the cabinet itself, leaving a very flushed look overall. So the elimination of the face frame works better for the contemporary styling that many younger families are looking for. It should also be pointed out that for similar quality, domestically manufactured frameless cabinetry would generally be more affordable compared to that of the European-imported lines, and the look of the European styling is not exclusive to European cabinets. Whether you are into the antique looks with elegant moldings and trim pieces, or the simple straight lines of a high-gloss slab door, MTKC is able to serve your needs. MTKC offers framed, frameless, and inset cabinetry in different styling, so please visit our showroom and meet with our designers. The above content was published in Home Digest Magazine in September 2006. For reference to the actual copy, please download this pdf file. For other related content on how to get started on your remodel, please see How to Measure and Sketch a Floor Plan video, Typical Work Flow Procedure, and Typical Construction...

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Getting Started On Your Remodel

Posted by on Sep 22, 2013 in Blog | Comments Off on Getting Started On Your Remodel

Remodeling! What an exciting thought! “I’m going to have a new kitchen, a new bathroom, new cabinets in the dining room, new everything!” Then somewhere along the line, you become too distracted by everything else that goes on in life: work, kids, vacations, and visiting family. And next thing you know, it has been a year since you started planning your project. You haven’t gotten anywhere, you realize, because you don’t have enough time to do everything. Then the project suddenly seems a lot more time-consuming and stressful. Remodeling is definitely an exciting idea. However, the remodeling process itself can be a bit stressful and troublesome due to the many variables in budgeting, planning, design, and construction. To get started, many folks like to hire a cabinetry designer or a general contractor. Choosing an experienced and knowledgeable designer will definitely lighten your load, but there are also some simple steps that you and your family can take to make the remodeling transition a smoother and more enjoyable process. Budgeting : Today’s market offers a wide variety of products with basic functions and features. But prices can differ significantly, depending on types of material, levels of quality and craftsmanship, sizes, additional features, and brand. It is not uncommon to see people choosing among options where the price of one is two to three times that of another. Essentially, it boils down to what you want. Having an honest and realistic budget will allow for more accurate planning and help guide your decisions. Also, discuss with your family what scale of remodeling is best suited to your home. Planning : Prior to working with your designer, determine which styles and colors you like. It helps to flip through magazines and visit a showroom to learn more about available products. You may want to visit model homes, or even the homes of your friends and family, just to see what others have done. Once you have an idea of how you want your room to look, the design process is much easier. Measuring : Every inch matters; therefore, it is important to have a professional double check your measurements before ordering cabinets or appliances. To get started, take some measurements, just so you have something to accompany the sketches or photos you’ll give to your designer. Providing accurate room measurements will work to your advantage, making your plans more precise. Remember to note the locations of windows and doors, as well as ceiling heights and any other obstacles in the plan. Choosing Appliances : Including the size of your sink and appliances is also very important. If you plan to install new sinks or appliances along with your new cabinets, you may either provide the new sizes or have your cabinetry designer choose for you. With accurate appliance measurements, you can make the most of available space. Lastly, try not to feel stressed. Enjoy the process. With the above four pieces of the puzzle in place, the rest will easily follow, and you will soon be looking at your newly remodeled home.   The above content was published in Home Digest Magazine in July 2006. For reference to the actual copy, please download this pdf file. For other related content on how to get started on your remodel, please see How to Measure and Sketch a Floor Plan video, Typical Work Flow Procedure, and Typical Construction...

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Typical Work Flow Procedure

Posted by on Sep 22, 2013 in Blog | Comments Off on Typical Work Flow Procedure

Thank you for your interest in working with MTKC, we couldn’t be more happy. We are very grateful to have an overwhelming amount of support from our customer base.  To make the most out of your time, we have standardized a simple procedure for you to follow, that way we can turn around a quotation to you as quickly as possible. Getting Started: Take measurements of your space and put it into a floor plan.  (check out our video on “how to measure and sketch a floor plan”) Snap a couple of quick pictures of the space. Email us both the floor plan and the pictures of your space, with a brief scope of work.  If you have appliance information, please provide them. We will do our best to turn the information over as quickly as possible and provide you with a good, better, best comparison quotation. If the first draft and quotation looks good, and you’d like to hire us moving forward, you may do so by placing a design deposit to further the work and have one of our designers come out for an in-home visits. Design Deposit Options: Option 1) $1,000 dollars for 10 hours* of design and consultation time.  This includes time for in home visit, measurements and consultation.  This is a design only service, and does not apply towards the cabinet order.  This option is most useful for customers who need to see many versions of their floor plans, and these customers will likely purchase multiple sets of 10 hours. Option 2) $2,000 dollars for the same 10 hours of design and consultation.  This deposit will apply towards the cabinet order.  This is useful for customers who are more certain about their design, and only need some minor fine tuning before they order cabinets.  This option allows for customers to work towards their cabinet order** without having to pay for the solely for design. *note – 10 hours is usually good for one full set of kitchen cabinet plans, or two to three basic revisions. This is a generalization based on standard cabinets with a typical size space, and does not refer to fully custom products on an extensively complicated house floor plans. **note – a payment of 50% or more is still necessary for cabinet ordering. Ordering Cabinets: Once product selections and designs are confirmed by you, the contractor, (and structural engineers if necessary), we will be ready to order cabinets.  Because all the cabinets we sell are special order, we take a 50% deposit for the cabinet order.  The remaining 50% will be due when cabinets are ready for delivery. Cabinet delivery: Once cabinets deliver, we generally like to go through the details w/ the installers on site, show them the adjustments, and make sure that they understand what goes where, so there’s no guess work.   Once they make any wrong cuts, we will need to wait for new parts to be made, and no one wants any down time in between on their project. =) For related content, please see our publication in Home Digest Magazine on Getting Started on Your Remodel, and our blog post Typical Construction...

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Wall Mount Vanity

Posted by on Sep 22, 2013 in Blog, Feature | Comments Off on Wall Mount Vanity

Wall Mount Vanity

Here’s a touch of modern with a floating vanity from Sollera Cabinets.  Our customer (name kept private, let’s call him Lance) Lance wanted something decently sleek looking to go with the beautiful tile color scheme in the shower, and this espresso colored, Hartford (shaker door) maple cabinet seems to do the job. The cabinets are essentially just shorter base cabinets with full height doors, and we voided the toe kick section.  That’s the easy part.  The important part is recognize now that the cabinet is not sitting on the floor on its toe kick, how will we secure it? We generally suggest some metal L-brackets underneath the cabinet boxes in the back wall, so it can serve as a sturdy support for the cabinets, while being out of sight unless you were on your hands and knees. Another success, wouldn’t you say?...

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Classic Painted Inset Cabinets

Posted by on Sep 21, 2013 in Blog, Feature | Comments Off on Classic Painted Inset Cabinets

Classic Painted Inset Cabinets

White painted cabinets are in, there’s no doubt about that.  Just open any magazine, or look on Houzz.com and I’m sure you’ll find plenty of photos to support that statement.  The inset construction though, to me it adds another layer of sophistication that is uncommon with the average price point vendors. Traditional American cabinets are made with a face frame, and many of the old school furniture makers used to make their doors smaller to fit within the frame of the cabinet.  Therefore, it is called “inset” because the doors are flushed with the face of the frame. This style of cabinet construction provides another surface for an additional detail on the cabinet frame, making it look more elegant.  At the same time, this style of cabinet requires much more precision in manufacturing, making it much more difficult to produce.  Of our three main product lines, only Plato Woodwork will offer an inset construction.  With only 1/8″ between doors and cabinet frames, sometimes you will encounter doors swelling over time due to seasonal changes in humidity.  For this reason, Plato actually tries to take into consideration the average humidity level of the home owner’s general geographic area, and tries to adjust by increasing/decreasing the moisture content during the manufacturing process.  It doesn’t prevent doors swelling, but it should minimize the chances of the doors rubbing against one another, and it’s certainly a great touch to add that I don’t see many other factories are willing to...

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