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Getting Started On Your Remodel

Posted by on Sep 22, 2013 in Blog | Comments Off on Getting Started On Your Remodel

Remodeling! What an exciting thought! “I’m going to have a new kitchen, a new bathroom, new cabinets in the dining room, new everything!” Then somewhere along the line, you become too distracted by everything else that goes on in life: work, kids, vacations, and visiting family. And next thing you know, it has been a year since you started planning your project. You haven’t gotten anywhere, you realize, because you don’t have enough time to do everything. Then the project suddenly seems a lot more time-consuming and stressful. Remodeling is definitely an exciting idea. However, the remodeling process itself can be a bit stressful and troublesome due to the many variables in budgeting, planning, design, and construction. To get started, many folks like to hire a cabinetry designer or a general contractor. Choosing an experienced and knowledgeable designer will definitely lighten your load, but there are also some simple steps that you and your family can take to make the remodeling transition a smoother and more enjoyable process. Budgeting : Today’s market offers a wide variety of products with basic functions and features. But prices can differ significantly, depending on types of material, levels of quality and craftsmanship, sizes, additional features, and brand. It is not uncommon to see people choosing among options where the price of one is two to three times that of another. Essentially, it boils down to what you want. Having an honest and realistic budget will allow for more accurate planning and help guide your decisions. Also, discuss with your family what scale of remodeling is best suited to your home. Planning : Prior to working with your designer, determine which styles and colors you like. It helps to flip through magazines and visit a showroom to learn more about available products. You may want to visit model homes, or even the homes of your friends and family, just to see what others have done. Once you have an idea of how you want your room to look, the design process is much easier. Measuring : Every inch matters; therefore, it is important to have a professional double check your measurements before ordering cabinets or appliances. To get started, take some measurements, just so you have something to accompany the sketches or photos you’ll give to your designer. Providing accurate room measurements will work to your advantage, making your plans more precise. Remember to note the locations of windows and doors, as well as ceiling heights and any other obstacles in the plan. Choosing Appliances : Including the size of your sink and appliances is also very important. If you plan to install new sinks or appliances along with your new cabinets, you may either provide the new sizes or have your cabinetry designer choose for you. With accurate appliance measurements, you can make the most of available space. Lastly, try not to feel stressed. Enjoy the process. With the above four pieces of the puzzle in place, the rest will easily follow, and you will soon be looking at your newly remodeled home.   The above content was published in Home Digest Magazine in July 2006. For reference to the actual copy, please download this pdf file. For other related content on how to get started on your remodel, please see How to Measure and Sketch a Floor Plan video, Typical Work Flow Procedure, and Typical Construction...

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Typical Work Flow Procedure

Posted by on Sep 22, 2013 in Blog | Comments Off on Typical Work Flow Procedure

Thank you for your interest in working with MTKC, we couldn’t be more happy. We are very grateful to have an overwhelming amount of support from our customer base.  To make the most out of your time, we have standardized a simple procedure for you to follow, that way we can turn around a quotation to you as quickly as possible. Getting Started: Take measurements of your space and put it into a floor plan.  (check out our video on “how to measure and sketch a floor plan”) Snap a couple of quick pictures of the space. Email us both the floor plan and the pictures of your space, with a brief scope of work.  If you have appliance information, please provide them. We will do our best to turn the information over as quickly as possible and provide you with a good, better, best comparison quotation. If the first draft and quotation looks good, and you’d like to hire us moving forward, you may do so by placing a design deposit to further the work and have one of our designers come out for an in-home visits. Design Deposit Options: Option 1) $1,000 dollars for 10 hours* of design and consultation time.  This includes time for in home visit, measurements and consultation.  This is a design only service, and does not apply towards the cabinet order.  This option is most useful for customers who need to see many versions of their floor plans, and these customers will likely purchase multiple sets of 10 hours. Option 2) $2,000 dollars for the same 10 hours of design and consultation.  This deposit will apply towards the cabinet order.  This is useful for customers who are more certain about their design, and only need some minor fine tuning before they order cabinets.  This option allows for customers to work towards their cabinet order** without having to pay for the solely for design. *note – 10 hours is usually good for one full set of kitchen cabinet plans, or two to three basic revisions. This is a generalization based on standard cabinets with a typical size space, and does not refer to fully custom products on an extensively complicated house floor plans. **note – a payment of 50% or more is still necessary for cabinet ordering. Ordering Cabinets: Once product selections and designs are confirmed by you, the contractor, (and structural engineers if necessary), we will be ready to order cabinets.  Because all the cabinets we sell are special order, we take a 50% deposit for the cabinet order.  The remaining 50% will be due when cabinets are ready for delivery. Cabinet delivery: Once cabinets deliver, we generally like to go through the details w/ the installers on site, show them the adjustments, and make sure that they understand what goes where, so there’s no guess work.   Once they make any wrong cuts, we will need to wait for new parts to be made, and no one wants any down time in between on their project. =) For related content, please see our publication in Home Digest Magazine on Getting Started on Your Remodel, and our blog post Typical Construction...

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Wall Mount Vanity

Posted by on Sep 22, 2013 in Blog, Feature | Comments Off on Wall Mount Vanity

Wall Mount Vanity

Here’s a touch of modern with a floating vanity from Sollera Cabinets.  Our customer (name kept private, let’s call him Lance) Lance wanted something decently sleek looking to go with the beautiful tile color scheme in the shower, and this espresso colored, Hartford (shaker door) maple cabinet seems to do the job. The cabinets are essentially just shorter base cabinets with full height doors, and we voided the toe kick section.  That’s the easy part.  The important part is recognize now that the cabinet is not sitting on the floor on its toe kick, how will we secure it? We generally suggest some metal L-brackets underneath the cabinet boxes in the back wall, so it can serve as a sturdy support for the cabinets, while being out of sight unless you were on your hands and knees. Another success, wouldn’t you say?...

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Classic Painted Inset Cabinets

Posted by on Sep 21, 2013 in Blog, Feature | Comments Off on Classic Painted Inset Cabinets

Classic Painted Inset Cabinets

White painted cabinets are in, there’s no doubt about that.  Just open any magazine, or look on Houzz.com and I’m sure you’ll find plenty of photos to support that statement.  The inset construction though, to me it adds another layer of sophistication that is uncommon with the average price point vendors. Traditional American cabinets are made with a face frame, and many of the old school furniture makers used to make their doors smaller to fit within the frame of the cabinet.  Therefore, it is called “inset” because the doors are flushed with the face of the frame. This style of cabinet construction provides another surface for an additional detail on the cabinet frame, making it look more elegant.  At the same time, this style of cabinet requires much more precision in manufacturing, making it much more difficult to produce.  Of our three main product lines, only Plato Woodwork will offer an inset construction.  With only 1/8″ between doors and cabinet frames, sometimes you will encounter doors swelling over time due to seasonal changes in humidity.  For this reason, Plato actually tries to take into consideration the average humidity level of the home owner’s general geographic area, and tries to adjust by increasing/decreasing the moisture content during the manufacturing process.  It doesn’t prevent doors swelling, but it should minimize the chances of the doors rubbing against one another, and it’s certainly a great touch to add that I don’t see many other factories are willing to...

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Beauty of Natural Walnut

Posted by on Sep 20, 2013 in Blog, Feature | Comments Off on Beauty of Natural Walnut

Beauty of Natural Walnut

Late in 2011, Sollera added walnut as part of their product offerings, and it has been very well received.  Walnut can be very versatile for designs.  Back when we had a showroom, we would receive many compliments on our walnut two tone display.  Walnut on its own though, has its own elegance, and here we did a kitchen in a simple, natural walnut finish across the board. Folks who like walnut tend to enjoy the wide variance of color within the natural wood, hence most of the orders I see are for natural finish (without any stains, just a clear top coat).  In this picture, you can see that walnut is mostly medium brown, with strands of white and light brown.  The grain and mineral deposits are in the darker brown tones, with some as dark as black. When planning with darker color materials, keep in mind of the lighting in the room.  Do you have enough natural lights?  If not, you may consider adding windows, or skylights to bring in more natural light for the room.  If those options are not available, you can always add some recessed lights in the ceiling, or pendants over your peninsula/island.  Keep in mind that the other elements can help even out the tones, so a lighter color countertop like these folks have done here would be a great way to start.  We went as far as putting in a nicely designed tile back splash to the ceiling, with decorative accents and trim at the focal point behind the stove.  I suggest home owners to work with tile design specialists for their decorative needs here as they are the most aware of the various materials and color schemes are available in the latest manufacturers’...

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